3.9.10

Life Cycle of Ladybugs

This small yellow, creature was found moving on my mulberry leaf.
At first, I thought it was a caterpillar...with legs.


Actually it is a larva. A rather long one indeed.


After 3 weeks of being a larva, it turns into a pupa.


 A vast transformation happens in just 7 days.


A yellow, spotless ladybug emerges...


Very soon, they would lay eggs and the cycle continues...


Oval-shaped eggs in upright clusters.


These spotless yellow ladybugs feed on mildew which is sometimes found on the underside of mulberry leaves.


The red spotted herbivorous ladybug above feeds on leaves and their favourite in my garden seem to be tomato leaves.


This red, shiny carnivorous ladybug is all gardeners' darling. They enjoy hanging around my chilli plants.

There are thousands of different species of ladybugs in the world and there are at least 3 types in my garden. How about you? What bugs do you see in your garden?

16 comments:

  1. My garden a bit cold for ladybug now. Nice you got 3 types at least in your garden. Good observation.

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  2. Im not sure whether those are actually ladybugs.
    Ladybug do not each plants - they eat other insect which are considered as pest especially alphids and mites.
    I guess this one is known as Harlequin bug - they look like ladybug but they are not the same.

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  3. Malay-Kadazan girl, With changing temperature throughout the year, I guess you will not have persistent bug infestation. Good thing, ya?

    James, It's good that we do not accept all that we read from other's blog. :) Anyway, from what I understand, some ladybugs do feed on leaves. One of these lady bugs is called the Mexican Bean Beetle or Epilachna varivestis. Another one is called the Alfalfa Lady Beetle or Subcoccinella vigintiquatuorpunctata.

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  4. So cute! Wish lady bugs will come to my garden, and eat those pesky aphids!

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  5. I have never seen a yellow lady bug. The 5th picture shows a dark yellow bug on top of a white one. Is the white one an exoskeleton or is it another bug?

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  6. Wow, did you really take all those pictures? Fantastic shots!! I have seen less of them these few days, maybe my hand-picking method is working!

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  7. There is this one type of ladybugs that will appear from nowhere everytime i grow eggplant or terung.... sweeping the leaves clean and shine. ~bangchik

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  8. Autumn Belle, It was quite a challenge to snap photos of the yellow lady bugs. They were playing hide and seek with my camera. The lighter colour one is a lady bug. It wouldn't keep still.

    Kitchen Flavours, Thanks for the compliments. I think it could be clearer, if only the bugs and my hands stop moving. Great to know they did not come back from the drain.

    Bangchik, That's nice. I didn't know they like eggplants.

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  9. What amazing photos! I do love seeing ladybugs in my garden. The larvae are also very welcome as they seem to eat more aphids then their parents :-)

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  10. wow, how amazing it is to have these photos! They perfectly show this cycle of life!

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  11. You mean the 2 yellow fellas are have a male and female having a rendezvous in your garden? My imagination is running wild now ;-)

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  12. Amazing photos. Like Autumn Belle, my imagination is also running wild:)

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  13. Wow! this is amazing shot of ladybuy life cycle! I think you can write an encyclopedia of ladybug now with this much of information and observation!!

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  14. Very good photography ;-) These bugs look lovely in these pictures he he...

    My current pest is the wholy white aphid that seems to be indestructable...

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  15. Hey One, those are splendid photos. Even with my 150mm it is difficult to get those shots, although i haven't tried those small insects yet. I confess, i haven't found a yellow ladybug, and didn't know their larvae are that big!

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  16. Noelle, Wendy, Malar, Notty Autumn Belle and Notty Lotusleaf, Thank you for your visit and comments.

    Stephanie, Sometimes those indestructible aphids decide to leave when we do a little pruning and add some organic fertilizer. All the best.

    Andrea and all, I also have something to confess. The eggs belong to a red ladybug, not the yellow ladybug. I suspect the yellow lady bugs' eggs are smaller because I couldn't see it. I use a point and shoot camera and don't know anything about lenses.

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